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Deal includes 36 LCVs
and HCVs for blood and transplant unit. Claire Hack
reports.

 

Photograph of Mike MacDougallHitachi
Capital’s commercial vehicles arm has signed a deal to supply 36
LCVs and HCVs to the National Health Service’s blood and transplant
unit.

The blue light Ford Focus estates
are divided between dry freight and refrigerated 3.5- and 7.5-tonne
vehicles, and funded on three- or five-year leases.

The deal will help Hitachi Capital
to cement its position in public sector leasing, a market it first
entered five years ago.

Hitachi Capital Commercial Vehicle
Services head of sales Mike MacDougall said: “We have an industry
specialist, Alan Mountain, who works just with the public sector
and has been in the industry for 10 years.

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“We moved into the public sector
when he joined us and we have been working with local authorities
in the main.”

The funder last year secured a
place on the framework agreement of procurement body Buying
Solutions, which took over commercial vehicle leasing for the NHS
in 2009.

The latest deal was arranged
through Buying Solutions’ framework for contract hire of commercial
vehicles, conversions and trailers. Six other suppliers are on the
list, including Automotive Leasing and ING Car Lease UK.

Larry Bannon, fleet manager for the
blood and transplant unit, the largest commercial vehicle operator
within the NHS, said: “Hitachi Capital’s inclusion in the Buying
Solutions agreement was important, as it meant that we didn’t have
to conduct a full tender process, which can be costly and
time-consuming.

“Hitachi Capital got the basics
right, informing us of progress every step of the way and advising
us on new initiatives.”

The new vehicles will be used to transport blood and blood
components from donors to patients, with Hitachi Capital
responsible for their safe decommissioning.